Antigua and Barbuda

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had a glorious trip from Nevis to Antigua,
the seas were calm with a light breeze.  So, we
motor sailed in order to reach the harbor in
daylight.  After trolling for 15 minutes,
Roxanne noticed the reel making noise.  
Before I could adjust the drag and slow the
boat, the fish had all of the line on the reel,
then SNAP the 80 lb test line broke and the
fish was lost.  Way off in the distance we
could see the fish jumping and trying to shake
the lure loose, as far as we could tell it was
some kind of marlin...pretty large too.


 

 

 

 

 

In Antigua we rejoined Jamie and picked up where we left off with the addition of two new
crew on
Jamie Nina and Bob to add to the fun.  We rafted up nearly everywhere we went.
 Since we haven't rafted up with anyone in over 12 years, it was even more reason to party.
 The kids would try to jump to the other boat even before we finished tying up!


 

 

 

 

English Harbor is a wonderfully restored
shipyard from the 1700's with many of
the buildings converted to hotels, shops,
and marine businesses.  The courtyard
inside one of the hotels had an awesome
garden.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the landmarks of English
Harbor are the pillars of the old sail
loft.  It seems strange to have such
ellaberate pillars for a sail loft, but
I'm sure there was a good reason for
it...I just can't think of it.









Overlooking English and Falmouth
harbors, is Shirley Heights with its
notorious Sunday night steel band,
and it's commanding view. The steel
band is the largest we've ever seen
there must be 20 or so members
playing all kinds of percussion
instruments.  They are so good that
we had to visit twice during our stay.
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next island was Barbuda.  Barbuda
prides themselves on keeping tourism to a
minimum.  We anchored off some of the
best beaches we've seen so far.  The sand
was pink and had the strangest texture.  
Walking in this sand felt like walking in
snow!  Your feet would sink down a few
inches and leave a footprint just like a
footprint in snow!  Weird.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a picture of Nina enjoying one of the
beautiful beaches in Barbuda.  Nina is one
of the most active, artistic, well read, and all
around pleasant individuals I have ever had
the pleasure of meeting.   Now that leaves
Bob.  Just look at this guy... I don't need to
say anything that his face and the faces of
his little followers don't convey. Bob, as he
puts it, "drives" Mega yachts for a living.  I
think it his role is more like the CEO of a
multimillion dollar company than just a
captain.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Along this several mile long stretch of
beach, there was only one other boat
anchored.  And the day Jamie left, we
were the only boat in sight.


 

 

 

 

 

While in Barbuda we gathered up some of the largest conch I have ever seen, Bob cooked the
best conch fritters ever, and we had a bonfire on the beach.  The largest conch shell is promised
to Ms. Brink ( the St. John principle ).   Just before leaving for Barbuda we stayed at a small
cove on the north side of Antigua where John and Bob, from
Jamie, and I went ashore to play
volleyball.  I think I cracked, bruised, or broke a rib diving for the ball...old men should play like
old men!

After Barbuda,
Jamie went on to the BVI and we decided to continue on down island back to
Antigua then as far as Martinique.  Leaving J
amie was again a traumatic experience, we were all
depressed while figuring out when we can hook up again.

While in Antigua again, we saw more of the inland areas including the capital.  It continues to
amaze us with the size of the houses in the Caribbean. It looks like whole families live in simple
buildings the size of American garden sheds.

Antigua is preparing for the up coming election, and in St. John the streets are packed with cars
outfitted with huge speakers mounted on top drive the streets blasting "campaign songs".  Music
is deeply rooted in Antiguan culture.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Roxanne is in the food industry in
Antigua....why is it always pet food?

 

 

 

 

 

We found a small
islet to explore.
The whole island
was about half an
acre.  We were
hoping to use it as
a mapping project
for school, but
ended up collecting
shells and sitting in
the sun.